Policy, Reports & Complaints Procedures

Policies, Reports, & Complaint Procedures

BUCKLEY POLICY
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (widely known today as FERPA) is an amendment to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. This amendment, most often referred to as the “Buckley Amendment,” became law on November 19, 1974. Simply stated, the law provides college students with the right to seek access to their institutional records, as well as the right to inspect the same institutional records. In this regard, the law requires that students be informed of their rights within the stated provisions of the law. Therefore, all CCCTS students are to be informed that in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 the following student rights will be adhered to on this campus:

  • The right of the student to “inspect and review” his or her institutional records.
  • The right of “an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content of their school records.”
  • The right to privacy for student records.

It follows from this Amendment that a faculty member should not post grades by using students’ names, social security numbers, or any other symbols that could divulge the identity of the students. It also follows that faculty should not announce the names of students and the grades they made on tests in class or leave graded material in public areas (e.g., halls) for student pick-up. Further, the posting or sharing of a student’s GPA shall not be shared on a President’s List or Dean’s List without the student’s written consent, and shall not be used in determining any scholarship or grant without the written consent of the student.

Students concerned with their student records and wanting to know how the procedures for inspecting, reviewing, and amending records, should refer to Policy 101-1025: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 in the current Student Handbook.

STATE AUTHORIZATION / STUDENT COMPLAINTS

State authorization is the legal directive that requires higher education institutions to comply with the laws and regulations of each state where it conducts business. Each state has the authority to regulate educational activities that are delivered within and across its borders, including distance/online education. Compliance with individual state requirements is now part of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, Amended in 2010. The act states that institutions offering distance education courses or programs must provide current and prospective students with the contact information for filing complaints with the college, its accrediting agency, and the state agencies that handle complaints in the students’ state of residence. There can be significant consequences to institutions that do not comply with state authorization regulations, so Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary take this requirement very seriously.

FILING A COMPLAINT AGAINST A SARA NORTH CAROLINA INSTITUTION

The National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA) provides a regional approach to oversight of distance education and streamlines the process for institutions to become compliant in other states for distance education. Membership in NC-SARA is voluntary. NC-SARA ensures students are afforded various consumer protection benefits as well as access to quality programs by establishing a set of guidelines to which member institutions must adhere.

SARA-NC INFORMATION AND COMPLAINT PROCESS

On July 16, 2015, representatives from all three higher education sectors in the state convened to discuss how to establish a solid foundation for North Carolina’s participation in the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA). After a year of intense work and negotiations, North Carolina became a member state of NC-SARA on June 9, 2016. SARA North Carolina is a program of the North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority. Check out http://www.saranc.org/AboutUs.html to learn more about SARA NC.

Students desiring to file a complaint against a SARA NC Institution should follow the SARA-NC Complaint Process and use the SARA-NC Complaint Form (PDF) and follow these directions. The student must complete both the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement North Carolina (SARA NC) Student Complaint Form and the NC Post-Secondary Education Complaints UNCGA Student Complaint Form.

As a last resort, students may contact the appropriate authority in the student’s state of residence. Follow the instructions on the website to submit your form.

SARA North Carolina
North Caroline State Education Assistance Authority
P.O. Box 14103
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709
Telephone: (855) SARA-1-NC (727-2162)
Telephone: (919) 549-8614, ext. 4667
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.saranc.org

Using the student complaint form, describe your complaint and provide supporting documentation, including the outcome of the institutional complaint process. Follow the instructions on the web site to submit your form.

  1. The NCSEAA will review a complaint that falls within its authority within 30 calendar days upon receipt. Qualifying complaints will be forwarded to the appropriate entity, as described below, for resolution:
    1. Complaints against any of the 17 UNC constituent institutions will be forwarded to the Office of Academic and Student Affairs at UNC General Administration;
    2. Complaints against any of the 58 state community colleges will be forwarded to the North Carolina Community College System;
    3. Complaints against any of the 36 independent colleges and universities will be forwarded to the North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities; and
    4. Complaints against any other institution will be reviewed by the NCSEAA.
  2. Reviews will be completed within 60 calendar days of the date a complaint is received. Staff representing the entities listed above will conduct initial reviews and submit findings and recommendations for resolution, if any, to the SARA North Carolina Director. The Director may extend the review by an additional 30 calendar days for a total of 90 days if necessary to ensure full understanding of the issues related to the complaint.
  3. If a complaint cannot be resolved by mutual agreement within the allotted period, the SARA North Carolina Director may deem that no action is needed, seek more information, or recommend action against an institution.
  4. The SARA North Carolina Director may consult with the SARA North Carolina Advisory Council before recommending action against an institution. Action may include direction to the institution to adhere to its institutional refund policy when the institution has not done so voluntarily.
  5. Any disposition by the SARA North Carolina Director is final with the exception of the decision to take any action against an institution based on a complaint. Should the Director choose to recommend action against an institution, such an action must be approved by the NCSEAA Board of Directors. The recommendation becomes final and binding following the Board’s approval. Nothing in this process precludes the State of North Carolina from using the laws of North Carolina to pursue action against an institution that violates those laws.
  6. The SARA NC Director will communicate the finding to the complainant and the institution involved in the complaint.
  7. The National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA) provides a regional approach to oversight of distance education and streamlines the process for institutions to become compliant in other states for distance education. Membership in NC-SARA is voluntary. NC-SARA ensures students are afforded various consumer protection benefits as well as access to quality programs by establishing a set of guidelines to which member institutions must adhere. To verify that Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary is authorized to offer Online Courses in your state, please visit the NC-SARA website.

 

 

CLERY ACT
The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, shortened and better know as the Clery Act is a federal law requires all colleges and universities that participate in federal financial aid programs to keep and disclose information about crime on and near their respective campuses and it is enforced by the U. S. Department of Education. Compliance is monitored by the United States Department of Education, which can impose civil penalties, up to $27,500 per violation, against institutions for each infraction and can suspend institutions from participating in federal student financial aid programs.

The Clery Act is a federal statute codified at 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f), with implementing regulations in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations at 34 CFR 668.46. The law is named for Jeanne Clery, a 19-year-old Lehigh University freshman who was raped and murdered in her campus residence hall in 1986. The Clery Act, signed in 1990, was originally known as the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act. Information about campus security and emergency response at Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary, as well as other institutions, can be found within https://ope.ed.gov/campussafety/#/.

FERPA (Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act)
Model Notification of Rights under FERPA for Postsecondary Institutions

(For additional information, visit: https://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) afford eligible students certain rights with respect to their education records. (An “eligible student” under FERPA is a student who is 18 years of age or older or who attends a postsecondary institution.) These rights include:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days after the day Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary receive a request for access. A student should submit to the Registrar or the Vice President of Academic Affairs, a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The school official will arrange for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the school official to whom the request was submitted, that official should advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA. A student who wishes to ask the school to amend a record should write the school official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants to be changed, and specify why it should be changed. If the school decides not to amend the record as requested, the school will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing re­garding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
  3. The right to provide written consent before the university discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The College or Seminary shall not disclose education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the College or Seminary in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person serving on the board of trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee. A school official also may include a volunteer or contractor outside of the College or Seminary who performs an institutional service or function for which the school would otherwise use its own employees and who is under the direct control of the school with respect to the use and maintenance of PII from education records, such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent or a student volunteering to assist another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the College or Seminary. Upon request, the school also discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. [NOTE TO POSTSECONDARY INSTITUTION: FERPA requires a school to make a reasonable attempt to notify each student of these disclosures unless the school states in its annual notification that it intends to forward records on request.]
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College or Seminary to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-8520

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) permits postsecondary institutions may make without consent. FERPA permits the disclosure of PII from students’ education records, without consent of the student, if the disclosure meets certain conditions found in §99.31 of the FERPA regulations. Except for disclosures to school officials, disclosures related to some judicial orders or lawfully issued subpoenas, disclosures of directory information, and disclosures to the student, §99.32 of FERPA regulations requires the institution to record the disclosure. Eligible students have a right to inspect and review the record of disclosures. A postsecondary institution may disclose PII from the education records without obtaining the prior written consent of the student:

  • To other school officials, including teachers, within the College or Seminary whom the school has determined to have legitimate educational interests. This includes contractors, consultants, volunteers, or other parties to whom the school has outsourced institutional services or functions, provided that the conditions listed in §99.31(a)(1)(i)(B)(1) – (a)(1)(i)(B)(2) are met. (§99.31(a)(1))
  • To officials of another school where the student seeks or intends to enroll, or where the student is already enrolled if the disclosure is for purposes related to the student’s enrollment or transfer, subject to the requirements of §99.34. (§99.31(a)(2))
  • To authorized representatives of the U. S. Comptroller General, the U. S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or State and local educational authorities, such as a State postsecondary authority that is responsible for supervising the university’s State-supported education programs. Disclosures under this provision may be made, subject to the requirements of §99.35, in connection with an audit or evaluation of Federal- or State-supported education programs, or for the enforcement of or compliance with Federal legal requirements that relate to those programs. These entities may make further disclosures of PII to outside entities that are designated by them as their authorized representatives to conduct any audit, evaluation, or enforcement or compliance activity on their behalf. (§§99.31(a)(3) and 99.35)
  • In connection with financial aid for which the student has applied or which the student has received, if the information is necessary to determine eligibility for the aid, determine the amount of the aid, determine the conditions of the aid, or enforce the terms and conditions of the aid. (§99.31(a)(4))
  • To organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf of, the school, in order to: (a) develop, validate, or administer predictive tests; (b) administer student aid programs; or (c) improve instruction. (§99.31(a)(6))
  • To accrediting organizations to carry out their accrediting functions. ((§99.31(a)(7))
  • To parents of an eligible student if the student is a dependent for IRS tax purposes. (§99.31(a)(8))
  • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. (§99.31(a)(9))
  • To appropriate officials in connection with a health or safety emergency, subject to §99.36. (§99.31(a)(10))
  • Information the school has designated as “directory information” under §99.37. (§99.31(a)(11))
  • To a victim of an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, subject to the requirements of §99.39. The disclosure may only include the final results of the disciplinary proceeding with respect to that alleged crime or offense, regardless of the finding. (§99.31(a)(13))
  • To the general public, the final results of a disciplinary proceeding, subject to the requirements of §99.39, if the school determines the student is an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense and the student has committed a violation of the school’s rules or policies with respect to the allegation made against him or her. (§99.31(a)(14))
  • To parents of a student regarding the student’s violation of any Federal, State, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the school, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the school determines the student committed a disciplinary violation and the student is under the age of 21. (§99.31(a)(15))
HARASSMENT AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE AND MISCONDUCT
Policy 101-1060: Reports of sexual and relational violence on the campus of CCCTS or an off-campus sponsored event will be thoroughly investigated by this institution as a possible Title IX violation. Regardless of the location on campus or campus sponsored event that the crime occurred, the victim and/or witness is encouraged to report the same to our campus police, Vice President of Student Affairs (VPSA), or any member of our Campus Security Authority (CSA) personnel. Once a complaint is brought to the institution, it will be thoroughly investigated. Additionally, the disciplinary committee will convene to consider the evidence and determine if the reported behavior has violated our harassment and sexual misconduct policy. At that time, they will decide upon the appropriate disciplinary action to be taken. All behaviors reported to the disciplinary committee that is deeded illegal may be reported to our city’s law enforcement for appropriate action

A. Ethnic and Gender Harassment and Discrimination

It is a crime intentionally to target any person on our campus based on their ethnicity or country of origin and gender. Any person who believes they have been criminally targeted based on their country of origin or gender should report the matter to campus police, the VPSA, or any CSA personnel. Appropriate investigative actions will be taken by the disciplinary committee when a violation of this policy has been reported. Persons found in violation may be suspended, expelled, and may be immediately removed from campus property and events. Violators of this policy and law may also be reported to local law enforcement for appropriate action.

B. Sexual Violence Policy

  1. Sexual Harassment

In harmony with this institution’s commitment to the Bible, along with state and federal laws, it deems every type of sexual harassment to be unbiblical, inappropriate, immoral, and illegal. Sexual harassment is defined as an “undesirable sexual advance, an unsolicited request for sexual favors, or verbal and/or physical gestures or conduct of a sexual nature that may birth an offensive environment.” Sexual harassment is also forcing someone to touch intimate body parts of another individual. (Sexual harassment does not; however, prevent a constructive discussion of human sexuality in an academic pedagogy).

Sexual harassment is, therefore, strictly prohibited by this institution. Any faculty, staff, or student of this institution that engages in the sexual harassment of any other member of this campus community or a visitor will be disciplined to the fullest extent allowed in our Student Handbook or the Employee Handbook. The discipline includes (but is not limited to) suspension, immediate expulsion from classes and the institution, or the termination of employment if found guilty of harassment charges.

Any incident of apparent sexual harassment by a faculty or staff should be reported to the perpetrator’s direct supervisor, a CSA, and/or the VPSA for investigation and redress in accordance with the Disciplinary Action policy in the appropriate Handbook (i.e., Faculty or Employee). On the other hand, incidents of apparent sexual harassment by a student should be reported to any CSA and/or the VPSA for investigation and redress in accordance with the Disciplinary Action policy in the Student Handbook.

  1. Sexual Assault

In harmony with this institution’s commitment to the Bible and state and federal laws, it deems every type of sexual assault to be unbiblical, inappropriate, immoral, and illegal. Furthermore, it shall be noted that the involvement of any unmarried student/staff or married persons in extra-marital affairs will be considered as a violation of this institution’s Code of Conduct. Persons found in violation of such may be disciplined according to the standards outlined respectively in the Employee and Student Handbook.

a. Definition and Description of Sexual Assault

Whereas this institution’s policy on sexual assaults and its judicial process, plus state and federal laws is concerned, sexual assault is defined as any uninvited sexual contact of any gender. This involves (but is not limited to) uninvited kissing, sexual touching or fondling—i.e., either directly or over clothing next to intimate body parts—and/or the deliberate unwanted contact with any intimate body parts with the perpetrator’s intimate body parts or inanimate objects without explicit invitation or consent to the same. It is also considered sexual assault if the individual is forced to touch or fondle the intimate body parts of another individual’s intimate body and/or to subject self to oral and/or vaginal penetration. As such, while a sexual assault certainly includes forced and/or uninvited vaginal penetration, it is not limited to the same.

b. Definition and Description of Sexual Consent

Whereas this institution’s policy on sexual assaults and the judicial process, plus state and federal laws is concerned; sexual consent is defined as the act of willing and voluntary verbal or non-verbal agreement between parties to participate in sexual behavior. Only the comprehensible, unambiguous words or actions should be used to determine consent. As such, any sexual contact with another person will be considered “non-consensual” where clear consent—i.e., verbal or non-verbal— is absent. Furthermore, a person has the right to change his/her mind at any juncture of the sexual contact to which one previously agreed. This is because “consent,” in it various forms, can be retracted at any juncture—i.e., where an individual clearly objects to further sexual activity and notifies the other party of his/her desire to cease the sexual activity. In addition, the absence of “no” must never be perceived to be synonymous with “yes.” It is only the clear communication of a “YES” that can ever mean “YES.”

Silence or non-communication must never be interpreted as consent and a person in a state of diminished judgment cannot consent. Consent requires that a person is able to freely choose between two options—i.e., “yes “and “no.” As such, a person cannot legally give consent, even in cases where he/she may have verbally said so, where one is asleep, inebriated, drugged, mentally unstable or handicapped, unconscious or otherwise unable to communicate, was coerced due to force, threat of force, or when the person was beaten, threatened, isolated, or intimidated through various means to say “yes.”

  1. Domestic Violence

Students should understand that domestic violence is any “asserted violent misdemeanor and felony offenses committed by the victim’s current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, persons similarly situated under domestic or family violence law, or anyone else protected under domestic or family violence law.”

Therefore, in harmony with the institution’s biblical and civic commitments, it considers domestic violence illegal and a serious offense. As such, any person who is a victim and/or witnesses to domestic violence on our campus or at a campus-sponsored event is encouraged to report the matter to campus police, the VPSA, or any other member of the CSA or local law enforcement. Any student deemed guilty of violating this policy may be disciplined to the fullest extent allowed in our Student Handbook. The discipline includes (but is not limited to) suspension, immediate expulsion from classes and the institution.

  1. Dating Violence (also known as Relationship or Domestic Violence)

Dating violence is defined as “violence by a person who has been in a romantic or intimate relationship with the victim. Whether there was such a relationship will be gauged by its length, type, and frequency of interaction.” Dating violence can also occur with persons on a first date where platonic relationships are incubated or may culminate with no further dates.

Dating violence is; therefore, descriptive of a pattern of behavior that uses certain mechanisms in dating to gain or maintain control over a dating or intimate partner. Often dating violence includes and/or leads to domestic violence, sexual harassment or assault, and is prohibited on the campus of CCCTS or any sponsored event.

Therefore, in harmony with the institution’s biblical and civic commitments, CCCTS considers dating violence to be a serious crime. As such, any person who is a victim or witness to dating violence on our campus or at an off-campus sponsored event is encouraged to report the matter to campus police, the VPSA, any CSA, or local law enforcement. Any student deemed guilty of violating the Sexual Violence policy via dating violence will be disciplined to the fullest extent allowed in our Student Handbook. This discipline includes (but is not limited to) suspension, immediate expulsion and immediate removal from classes and the institution. The matter may also be reported to local law enforcement for appropriate action.

  1. Stalking

Stalking is defined as a “course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for her, his, or others’ safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress.” Stalking, therefore, is a crime that is no respecter of age, ethnicity, or religious persuasion. It penetrates its victims physically, psychologically, and emotionally via emails, social media, letter/notes, and often escalates to domestic violence, sexual harassment or assault, and is prohibited on the campus of CCCTS or any off-campus sponsored event.

CCCTS is committed to providing a hostile-free educational environment for all members of our campus community. As such, stalking, as is defined above, is a crime that violates federal, state, and local laws, CCCTS’ Code of Conduct and is; therefore, not tolerated on our campus or at any off-campus sponsored event.

CCCTS encourages victims or witnesses to dating violence on campus or at an off-campus sponsored event to report the matter to campus police, the VPSA, any CSA, or local law enforcement. Any student deemed guilty of violating any aspect of this Harassment and Sexual Misconduct policy via stalking, will be disciplined to the fullest extent allowed in our Student Handbook. This discipline includes (but is not limited to) suspension, expulsion and the immediate removal from classes in which the victim is also enrolled, and/or the immediate removal from campus altogether. The matter may also be reported to local law enforcement for appropriate action.

C. Reporting Sexually Misconduct

While it is the victim’s choice to report or not to report sexual violence or any other crimes; this institution strongly recommends that students report any sexual violence crimes of which you have been a victim or witness. The reporting of sexual violence will facilitate the investigation, institutional discipline (including but not limited to expulsion) of the perpetrator(s), and could also lead to the arrest and prosecution of the accused. Students are encouraged to report crimes to CMPD, campus police, the VPSA, or a CSA. The reports made with this institution will be taken seriously, thoroughly investigated, and the accused who are found guilty will be disciplined. The leadership of the institution and all involved CSAs will take every precaution to protect the identity of the victim.

D. Victim’s Response to Sexual Misconduct

Depending on nature, the location where the sexual misconduct occurred and the location of the perpetrator, victim/survivor may:

  1. Retreat to a safe place where you are no longer being hurt by the assailant.
  2. Intentionally preserve evidence of the misconduct to aid the investigation and/or prosecution.
  3. Depending on the nature of the misconduct, call 911 for appropriate emergency service or to report the crime to law enforcement in the jurisdiction where the assault occurred.
  4. As soon as it is safe, report the misconduct to the VPSA or CSA personnel. This will commence a Title IX investigation, provide you access to academic and emergency accommodations, and order of “no-contact” where applicable.
  5. Seek advice and counseling from the VPSA or any other member of the CSA team.
  6. File for a restraining order (i.e., Order of Protection-OP) with the court system to prevent the perpetrator from contacting you on or off-campus where necessary and even in cases where a police report is not made.
  7. Present an original copy of the OP to the VPSA (or the President’s Office in the absence of the VPSA) so the institution will be aware of the OP and take necessary steps to protect the victim on campus and make concessions to facilitate those involved.

E. Campus No Contact Orders and Protective Orders

The VPSA (or the President in the VPSA’s absence) may issue a Campus No Contact Order (CNCO) when a student reports that she/he is the victim of harassment of sexual misconduct at the hands of a fellow student on campus or at an off-campus sponsored event. The CNCO will cover matters related to sexual harassment and assaults, domestic and dating violence, stalking, and hate crimes. Students who violate CCCTS’ Sexual Misconduct policy will also be in violation of the institution’s Code of Conduct and state/local laws. Therefore, victims or witnesses to such breaches are strongly encouraged to report the matter to campus police, the VPSA, or any CSA as soon as possible to facilitate investigation and institutional discipline of the perpetrator(s). The school, via the Office of the VPSA, may also report the matter to local law enforcement for appropriate actions.

  1. Campus No Contact Orders (CNCO)

In an effort to protect students who become victims of Sexual Misconduct on campus or at an off-campus sponsored event, the Office of the VPSA (or the Office of the President in the absence of the VPSA) can issue a Campus No Order of Contact (CNCO) upon receipt of a report that alleges certain violation(s) to the Sexual Violence policy. The CNCO can be issued while the report is being investigated in an effort to prevent further harm to the victim or situations that may disrupt class and the normal business operation of the institution. Furthermore, a CNCO can also be issued in cases where the respondent is not formerly found guilty of the alleged offense, and further contact with the accuser would be ill-advised.

CNCO can also be requested by a student who chooses not to file and/or press formal charges against the accused with local law enforcement. In such cases, the CNCO may be requested and granted in circumstances where it is in the best interest of the involved parties and the institution relative to the promotion of civility and peace. In such cases, the CNCO will usually state that the institution “has received report(s) that the accused may have violated the institution’s Sexual Misconduct Policy and Code of Conduct and that this Campus No Contact Order prohibits the accused from contacting the accuser in person (i.e., any kind of physical contact), via stalking (physically or via cyberspace), phone call, texting, emails, Facebook/Twitter and any other type of social networking, a third party or third party communication, etc.

The CNCO may be served via email, snail mail, or hard copy delivered to the alleged perpetrator(s) and will include details relevant to the nature, extent, and ramifications of violation of the same. A copy of the same CNCO may also be presented to the accuser via email, snail mail, or personal delivery of hard copy as well. Once served, any further means of contacting the victim/accuser will be considered as a violation of the institution’s Code of Conduct and may result in immediate suspension, expulsion, and removal from the institution. The duration of the CNCO is determined by the VPSA (or the Office of the President in the absence of the VPSA). A copy of the CNCO will also be placed in the accused and complainant’s student file.

Students should understand, however, that the CNCO is dissimilar to a court-ordered restraining order. As such, the CNCO does not guarantee that the accused and complainant will be able to avoid all sightings of each other on our campus or in the surrounding community. The CNCO is limited to campus and invites accountability that may give students pause or a measure of peace of mind that intentional contact will be avoided by all parties involved.

  1. Orders of Protection on CCCTS Campus

If the victim/survivor of a sexual misconduct that took place on the campus of CCCTS or at an off-campus sponsored event files for and is granted an OP against his/her perpetrator(s) who is/are active student(s) of CCCTS; the original copy of the OP must be brought to the VPSA (or the Office of the President in the absence of the VPSA). Such an Order will be copied and filed. The information in the OP, in addition to other information from campus police/security and/or other CSAs, will be used by the institution to enforce the OP on campus and off-campus sponsored events—thereby alleviating the possibilities of contact with the victim and the accused. Once the OP is received, the institution, via the office of the VPSA (or the Office of the President in the absence of the VPSA) will issue a CNCO—i.e., if the same has not been previously issued to all related parties. Violation of the CNCO and the OP may result in the immediate suspension, expulsion, and/or removal from all school property and previously planned events in which the person(s) planned on participating. The institution may also report the violation of the OP to local law enforcement for appropriate action.

F. Support and Accommodations for Victims

CCCTS is committed to supporting students who become victims of harassment or sexual misconduct on our campus or at an off-campus sponsored event. Once a report of harassment, discrimination due ethnic origin or gender, or sexual misconduct has been received; the VPSA (or Office of the President in the absence of the VPSA) will convene the disciplinary committee and launch an investigation. In the interim, all necessary safety accommodations and support services will be offered to the victim. Special victim services and accommodations include: (a) pastoral counseling; (2) peer/student Ambassador; (3) external counseling services by referral; (4) CNCO by request and/or where deemed necessary by the VPSA or the Office of the President in the absence of the VPSA; and (5) course attendance accommodations.

Due to the complexities of discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct discussed in this policy, victims may need additional assistance obtaining one or more of the following imperatives: (1) Campus No Contact Order; (2) filing a police report; (3) a restraining order from the court system; (4) witness statement; (5) change in academic status in one or all classes or even academic program; (6) the imposition of suspension of accused during investigation; (7) medical and/or psychological resources and support; and (8) peer support. In such cases, the victim (or someone permitted to act on behalf of the victim) should contact the VPSA or Office of the President (in the absence of the VPSA) for assistance.

NOTE: Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary was granted Exemption from fifteen sections of Title IX. The following website from the Office of Civil Rights provides a PDF Link showing the fifteen approved exceptions to Title IX. (https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/correspondence/other.html?page=5&offset=40)

SEVERE WEATHER POLICY
The institution will hold classes according to schedule. In the event of inclement weather or any unplanned closing, emergency notifications will be sent via SMS to active faculty, staff, and students who have opted into SMS notifications (USA and Canada only), otherwise via email. The administration will post closings, delays, or early dismissal on local television stations. Senior administrators make a collective decision to alter class schedules with the President holding the responsibility to take the lead and he alone makes the final decision after talking to key administrators. Residential faculty, staff, and students normally live within seventy-five miles of the main campus, with weather and road conditions within this circumference greatly influences the decision to close, delay, or dismiss classes early. The ultimate goal in making the decision is the safety and well-being of students, faculty, and staff.

Closure of the Campus and residential classes do not normally affect Distance Learning Classes, just as the open status of the Campus does not ensure that online students are not experiencing severe inclement weather in other regions of the country. Therefore, distance-learning students experiencing severe inclement weather that includes loss of power or internet are to notify both their professor and the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Decisions on handling online class assignments are made on a case-by-case basis depending on the severity of verifiable inclement weather and or loss of electricity and internet services; in some cases, the student may be asked to provide proof of loss of said services.

STUDENT COMPLAINT PROCESS
While the institution tries hard to provide a variety of appropriate student services, which effectively support the educational, social, spiritual, and moral development of the students. The institution recognizes that from time to time a student may have a grievance they wish to voice. The institution uses several tools to gauge student satisfaction with services provided through the following methods:

  • The institution regularly takes surveys to help the leadership better understand the student’s thoughts and impressions about student services.
  • The administration attempts to promote and maintain an open-door policy to encourage students to share concerns and complaints.
  • The Board allows the President of the Student Government Association to request placement on the agenda to attend and address serious concerns of the student body.

However, the institution understands that this may not be convenient or sufficient. Therefore, this policy communicates appropriate steps students may take in sharing grievances in a positive and confidential manner.

Should a student experience displeasure and choose to prayerfully pursue the issue, the student must determine if his situation requires “Due Process” (usually relates to personal differences between two parties, causing one party to feel mistreated, such as displeasure concerning a grade or seating arrangements), or “The Policy on Student Complaints,” which refers more to displeasure concerning student services (snacks, library services, parking, etc.).

(Due Process) In order to assure students of fair consideration of problems, the institution has established the following channel of review and appeal, without prejudice, to higher levels of authority:

  1. Should a problem exist, the student should attempt to resolve the grievance by discussing it with the parties involved.
  2. If the matter cannot be resolved in this matter, the student should go to his/her assigned advisor for help and assistance.
  3. If the matter is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction, the student may (1) contact the office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs if the issue is academic in nature; or (2) the Vice President of Student Affairs if the issue is other than academic, and request an appointment. The student should be prepared to provide documentation and supporting evidence to the appropriate Vice President related to the grievance during the appointment. If the matter still is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction, the student may contact the Office of the President in writing requesting to schedule a hearing.
  4. The office of the President will call the student to arrange a date for the hearing. A written detailed statement of the formal grievance with supporting documentation must be submitted to the Office of the President at least seven days before the hearing. All parties will be requested to attend the hearing and the President’s decision shall be final.
  5. All information and records of complaints, appeals, and proceedings are securely maintained in the Office of the President.
  6. Instructions for filing a complaint with TRACS, the accrediting agency, may be found on the TRACS website.

Students who feel that the administration or faculty are not dealing properly with their complaint may contact the appropriate authorities listed below.

North Carolina Post-Secondary Education Complaints
c/o Student Complaints
University of North Carolina System Office
910 Raleigh Road
Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2688
Phone: (919) 962-4550
Email: [email protected]
Website: North Carolina Post-Secondary Education Complaints

TRACS STUDENT COMPLAINT PROCESS

Transnational Association of Christian Colleges accredits Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary and Schools (TRACS) accredit Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary. If a complaint directly related to specific compliance with the standards of accreditation is not satisfactorily resolved, students are able to file a complaint with TRACS.

PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE
We do not currently offer any programs that lead to licensure or certification.

PRIVACY POLICY
This site may contain hypertext links to other World Wide Web sites that are completely independent of this site. CCCTS makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or authenticity of the information contained in any such hypertext link, and any hypertext link to another person or entity shall not in any manner be construed as an endorsement by CCCTS of such person’s or entity’s World Wide Web site, products or services. Your confidential use of this site cannot be guaranteed by CCCTS. CCCTS shall not be responsible for any harm that you or any person may suffer because of a breach of confidentiality in respect to your use of this site or any information you transmitted to this site.

There are instances where CCCTS requests personally identifiable information such as name, mailing address, email address, type of request and possibly additional information to be collected and stored in a manner appropriate to the nature of the data by CCCTS and is used to fulfill your request. CCCTS makes every effort to ensure the secure collection and transmission of sensitive user information using industry accepted data collection and encryption methodologies. The information you provide is used by CCCTS only and will not be sold, exchanged or given to any other company for that company’s independent use.

The CCCTS web site may transfer cookies to your hard drive for record-keeping purposes. The use of cookies is an industry-standard and you will find them at most major web sites. Most browsers are initially set to accept cookies. If you would prefer, you can set yours to refuse cookies or to alert you when cookies are being sent.

TITLE IX NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY
This institution admits and educates qualified students who are personally committed to Jesus Christ without regard to race, color, handicap, sex, age, or national or ethnic origin. This institution does not discriminate in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, financial aid and scholarship programs, and other school-administered programs.

NOTE: Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary was granted Exemption from fifteen sections of Title IX. The following website from the Office of Civil Rights provides a PDF Link showing the fifteen approved exceptions to Title IX. (https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/correspondence/other.html?page=5&offset=40)

Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF)

05/19/2020

Interim Report for the Disbursement of Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF) Monies 18004(a) (1) that Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary received on 04/23/2020.

Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary did sign and return to the Department of Education the Certification and Agreement on 04/13/2020 acknowledging that the student portion of HEERF will be disbursed per the Department of Education guidelines.

The HEERF monies received on 04/23/2020 totaled $16,426.00. The monies were disbursed to 15 students via direct deposit that met the criteria set forth by the CCCTS policy (see below) that was written per Department of Education guidelines.  All of the HEERF student portions was disbursed on 04/23/2020 in the amount of $1,095.07 to 15 students totaling $16,426.05.

HEERF Policy

Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary is going to distribute the advanced funds of the Higher Education Emergency Relief Funds in the following manner:

  1. All students that are currently receiving tuition discounts of any kind (this does not include endowed scholarships) are not eligible for disbursement. These tuition discounts include-Apex (teach out discount), UMBA, LIFE Grant, International Discount, and the Mentoring/Job Skill Grant.
  2. All students that have not met the financial aid requirements to receive federal financial aid funds due to non-participation in class or providing graded assignments, not providing required FAFSA or verification paperwork (federal verification process), or never officially withdrawing from CCCTS during the withdrawal period of the semester or entry point within the semester.
  3. Per Federal Register Vol. 85, No. 53 at 15337-38, those students who were enrolled exclusively in an online program on March 13, 2020, the date of the President’s Proclamation, “Declaring a National Emergency Concerning the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak is not eligible for emergency financial aid funds.
  4. All remaining students that were participating in residential classes will receive an equal disbursement of the Higher Education Emergency Relief Funds via direct deposit once funds are received.

heerf-quarterly-reporting-Sept-2020

Contact CCCTS

Hours of Operation
Monday – Friday: 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Saturday – Sunday: Closed

Physical Address
7520 E. Independence Blvd., Suite 100
Charlotte, NC 28227-9664

Phone: 704-334-6882